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Curriculum Development Funding

VentureWell - Faculty Grants - Support the creation of new courses and programs in which students develop ideas and gain the skills to bring them to market.  Awards grants to colleges and universities that support programs and projects in invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship education. Faculty and staff from member institutions apply for course and program grants to develop new courses and programs, or to strengthen existing programs by adding new components or collaborating with faculty members from other disciplines. The aim of successful funded courses and programs is to structure curricula that foster and develop independent E-Teams. Members are encouraged to find creative approaches to addressing such issues as poverty, disease, and environmental degradation through affordable design, technologies that solve critical problems and meet basic human needs (such as food, water, shelter, health, safety, and education), and pedagogical approaches that encourage awareness of and interest in these global issues. Course and program grant proposals may focus on introducing these issues to students with a design course, adding socially-focused E-Teams to an existing entrepreneurship course, or developing an entirely original program to engage students in problem-solving endeavors. Course and program grants range in size from $2,000 to $50,000 and support programs lasting one to three years. Deadlines: November 7, 2014 and May 8, 2015.

National Endowment for the Humanities – Challenge Grants
Help institutions secure long-term improvements and support for their humanities programs and resources. The most common use of Challenge Grants funds is the augmentation or establishment of endowments that produce income to support ongoing humanities activities in education, public programming, scholarly research, and preservation. More specifically, endowments could be established to address such needs as undergraduate teaching support, professional chairs in the humanities, humanities course development, multimedia and classrooms for humanities teaching, and the purchase and maintenance of computing and media equipment for humanities courses; campus library support, including library acquisitions, the fulfillment of immediate library acquisition needs, the funding of positions for campus librarians and staff, and the development or expansion of on-line cataloging systems; and faculty development support, including funding for research, travel, and curriculum awards. Prior to submitting a proposal, you are encouraged to contact program officers who can offer advice about preparing the proposal, supply samples of funded applications, and review draft proposals. These comments are not part of the formal review process and have no bearing on the final outcome of the proposal, but previous applicants have found them helpful in strengthening their applications. Program staff recommend that draft proposals be submitted six weeks before the deadline. Better than one application in four is funded. For first time applicants, Challenge Grants will provide one dollar for every two dollars raised, usually from $30,000 to $500,000. Deadline: May 5, 2015.

National Foundation for the Improvement of Education – Learning and Leadership Grants. Fund recipients to participate in a high-quality professional development experience or organize a collegial study group that leads to improvements in practice, curriculum, and student achievement in the school or university. "One-shot" professional growth experiences such as attending a national conference or engaging a professional speaker are discouraged. Maximum Award: $5,000. Deadlines: February 1, June 1, October 15.

National Foundation for the Improvement of Education - Student Achievement Grants - To improve the academic achievement of students in U.S. public schools and public higher education institutions in any subject area. The proposed work should engage students in critical thinking and problem solving that deepen their knowledge of standards-based subject matter. The work should also improve students’ habits of inquiry, self-directed learning, and critical reflection. Grant funds may be used for resource materials, supplies, equipment, transportation, software, or professional development necessary to implement the innovative idea. Award: $5,000. Deadlines: February 1, June 1, October 15

National Science Foundation – Advanced Technological Education.
Promotes improvement in technological education at the undergraduate and secondary school levels by supporting curriculum development: the preparation and professional development of college faculty and secondary school teachers; internships and field experiences for faculty, teachers, and students. With an emphasis on two-year colleges, the program focuses on the education of technicians for high-technology fields that drive our nation’s economy. It is estimated that 60 new or continuing awards will be made with about $40 million in funding available. Deadline: October for full proposal. Program Officers: V Celeste  Carter vccarter@nsf.gov (703) 292-4651; Gerhard  L. Salinger gsalinge@nsf.gov (703) 292-5116 

Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science,Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (TUES).  Seeks to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all undergraduate students. The program supports efforts to create new learning materials and teaching strategies, develop faculty expertise, implement educational innovations, assess learning and evaluate innovations, and conduct research on STEM teaching and learning. Proposals may focus on one or more of the following components: Creating Learning Materials and Teaching Strategies, Developing Faculty Expertise, Implementing Educational Innovations, Assessing Learning and Evaluating Innovations, Conducting Research on Undergraduate STEM Teaching and Learning. Projects that explore cyber learning, specifically learning with cyber infrastructure tools such as networked computing and communications technologies, are of special interest. Deadline: May. Award: $200,000. 

Department of Education – Business and International Education Program.  *Not offered this year.
About 33 awards of up to two years are made averaging $85,000 to enter into agreements with trade associations and businesses to improve the academic teaching of the business curriculum and to conduct outreach activities that expand the capacity of the business community to engage in international economic activities. Community colleges have been reasonably successful in being funded. Eligible activities include; Improving business and international education curriculum, including the development of new programs for mid-career or part-time students; Conducting research and developing specialized teaching materials appropriate to business-oriented students; and, Establishing internships overseas to enable foreign language students to develop their foreign language skills and knowledge of foreign cultures and societies. **Institutional matching of 50% of the total cost of the program is a requirement. Deadline: January each year.  Contact: Tanyelle Richardson 202-502-7626. Tanyelle.Richardson@ed.gov

International Research and Studies Program. *Not offered this year.
About 19 awards averaging $125,000 a year for up to three years are made to support surveys, studies, and instructional materials development to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies, and other international fields to provide full understanding of the places in which foreign languages are commonly used. Examples of funded projects are: “Teaching About the Americas: An Electronic Curriculum”, “Instructional Materials on China and Japan”, “Evaluation Needs in College Foreign Language Programs.” Deadline: November each year. Contact: Beth D. MacRae, 202-502-7596, bethmacrae@ed.gov

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education – Comprehensive Program.*Not offered this year.
Fifty to 60 awards of up to 36 months averaging $250,000 a year will be made to assist institutions of higher education singularly or in consortia to improve education on their campuses. The program supports and disseminates innovative reform projects that promise to be models for improving the quality of postsecondary education and increasing student access. Awards are made in a number of areas including: postsecondary education access; retention and completion; student preparation for college; cost-effectiveness; and curricula reform.

Invitational priorities include; (1) projects to improve the quality of K-12 teaching through new models of teacher preparation and through new kinds of partnerships between schools and colleges that enhance students’ preparation for, access to, and success in college, (2) projects to promote innovative reforms in the curriculum and instruction of various subjects at the college preparation, undergraduate, and graduate/professional levels, (3) projects designing more cost-effective ways of improving post-secondary instruction and operations, and (4) projects supporting new ways to ensure equal access to postsecondary education and to improve rates of retention and program completion. Deadline: July. Sarah Beaton, Program Officer and Co-Coordinator, Comprehensive Program (202) 502-7621, sarah.beaton@ed.gov

 

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